Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Women's Six Nations Week 4 review by Ciarán Duffy




Ireland 12 – 15 Scotland

Hugely disappointing day for Ireland as they slipped to a defeat against Scotland, which sees the Scots move up to 11th in the world rankings, their highest ever position.  Scotland led 0 – 3 at halftime after a penalty from Nelson.  

After the break Nelson touched down to extend Scotlands lead.  Ireland hit back with a penalty try to cut the gap to 1 point. Rollie got over just after the hour-mark with Skeldon converting to push out Scotlands lead.  Fitzpatrick got one back for Ireland. In the end Scotland disrupted an Irish lineout and ultimately saw out the game. Ireland move down to 8th in the world rankings.  

France 18 – 17 England

France edged out England in the de facto decider, in front of 17, 440 people, a record for a womens international.  Dow touched down for England to put them in front, McLean converted. France hit back with tries Tremouliere and Drouin to go in front 10 – 7 at the break.  

England retook the lead in the second half with Cokayne getting over, Mclean converted.  Tremouliere kicked a penalty for France, McLean did the same for England With a minute to go Tremouliere touched down to give France the victory, and in all likelihood the championship.  

Wales 15 – 22 Italy

Italy picked up their first win of this years tournament, taking a bonus point in the process.  Locatelli opened the scoring 9 minutes in, Sillari converted. Wales took the lead with a penalty from Wilkins and a try from Butchers.  Italy would go in ahead at the break, Magatti crossed over to make the score 8 – 12.

Rigoni crossed over for the Italians in the second half, before Harries touched down for Wales, Wilkins converting.  Sillari sealed the victory late on with a try. Italy move up to 7th in the world rankings, their highest ever position.  

Table


Pts
PD +/-
1
France
19
+105
2
England
16
+121
3
Ireland
10
+9
4
Scotland
5
-56
5
Wales
5
-81
6
Italy
5
-98
Ciarán Duffy (@TheVoiceDepth) is a Leinster supporter and self-proclaimed ‘big cheese’ of Post To Post (@PostToPostSport).   He’ll write about anything rugby under the condition he gets to take it too seriously.
*****
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